Resources for NPs: Guide to National & State Professional Associations

The number of nurse practitioners (NPs) in the US is growing rapidly, up from 82,000 in 2001 to 290,000 in 2020. NPs provide care to millions of Americans by evaluating patients, writing prescriptions, and bringing a comprehensive perspective to healthcare. While NPs are completing their estimated 1.06 billion patient visits every year, professional associations at both the national and state level give them a unified voice.

Professional associations play a crucial role in progressing the nurse practitioner profession, and they provide a wide range of services. Associations can supply resources on conferences, advocacy issues, certifications, continuing education, networking, research opportunities, position statements, and professional development. They are created for and run by nurse practitioners.

Each association varies in the services they offer and the populations they serve. Some associations are purely geographical, focusing on the needs of NPs in a particular state or region. National associations are often grouped according to an NP’s specialization, and the issues that go along with it. International associations go one step further and explore how NPs can participate in humanitarian efforts and outreach leadership.

No matter where a nurse practitioner is, no matter what they specialize in, no matter who they serve, a professional organization exists to support them in their efforts. Often, a nurse practitioner will belong to more than one. To get a look at the national, state, and international professional associations for nurse practitioners, read on.

National Associations

The largest and most important professional association for nurse practitioners is the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP). With over 109,000 members, it acts as the collective voice for America’s NPs. Along with regional directors and state representatives, the AANP dedicates itself to progressing the profession, advancing advocacy efforts, and partnering with corporations and organizations to help NPs improve health outcomes for their patients.

Other national associations are formed around different specialties and dive more deeply into the issues involved with these specific areas of practice.

National associations for NPs include:

  • American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP)
  • American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners (AAENP)
  • Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology (APSHO)
  • Doctors of Nursing Practice (DNP)
  • Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA)
  • National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP)
  • National Academy of Dermatology Nurse Practitioners (NADNP)
  • National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF)
  • Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation (NPHF)
  • Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH)

State Associations

State associations fill a critical role in the nurse practitioner community. Smaller and more focused than their national counterparts, they can zero-in on topics that are unique to the particular area in which a nurse practitioner works. Licensing requirements, scope of practice rules, advocacy issues, and population demographics all vary from state to state, and associations at the state level are best suited to address these areas in an informed and collective manner.

StateOrganization(s)
AlabamaNurse Practitioner Alliance of Alabama (NPAA)
Central Alabama Nurse Practitioner Association (CANPA)
Northern Alabama Nurse Practitioner Association (NANPA)
AlaskaAlaska Nurse Practitioner Association (ANPA)
ArizonaArizona Nurse Practitioner Council (ANPC)
ArkansasArkansas Nurse Practitioner Association (ANPA)
CaliforniaCalifornia Association for Nurse Practitioners (CANP)
ColoradoNorthern Colorado Nurse Practitioner Coalition
Colorado Society of Advanced Practice Nurses (CSAPN)
ConnecticutConnecticut Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Society (CTAPRNS)
DelawareDelaware Coalition of Nurse Practitioners (DCNP)
FloridaFlorida Association of Nurse Practitioners (FANP)
GeorgiaGeorgia Coalition of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (CAPRN)
United Advanced Practice Registered Nurses of Georgia (UAPRN)
South Georgia Association of Nurse Practitioners (SGANP)
HawaiiHawaii Association of Professional Nurses (HAPN)
IdahoNurse Practitioners of Idaho (NPI)
IllinoisIllinois Society for Advanced Practice Nursing (ISAPN)
IndianaCoalition of Advanced Practice Nurses in Indiana (CAPNI)
Society of Nurses in Advanced Practice (SNAP)
IowaIowa Nurse Practitioner Society (INPS)
KansasKansas Advanced Practice Nurses Association (KAPN)
Northeast Kansas Nurse Practitioner Alliance (NEK NPA)
KentuckyKentucky Association of Nurse Practitioners & Nurse-Midwives (KCNPNM)
LouisianaLouisiana Association of Nurse Practitioners (LANP)
Louisiana Nurse Practitioner Foundation (LNPF)
MaineMaine Nurse Practitioner Association (MNPA)
MarylandMaryland Academy of Advanced Practice Clinicians (MAAPC)
Nurse Practitioner Association of Maryland (NPAM)
MassachusettsMassachusetts Coalition of Nurse Practitioners (MCNP)
MichiganMichigan Council of Nurse Practitioners (MICNP)
MinnesotaAssociation of Southeast Minnesota Nurse Practitioners (ASMNP)
Minnesota Nurse Practitioners (MNP)
MississippiMississippi Association of Nurse Practitioners (MANP)
MissouriAssociation of Missouri Nurse Practitioners (AMNP)
MontanaMontana Nurses Association (MNA)
NebraskaNebraska Nurse Practitioners (NNP)
NevadaNevada Advanced Practice Nurses Association (NAPNA)
New HampshireNew Hampshire Nurse Practitioner Association (NHNPA)
New JerseyAdvanced Practice Nurses of New Jersey (APN-NJ)
New MexicoNew Mexico Nurse Practitioner Council (NMNPC)
New YorkNurse Practitioner Association for New York State (NPA)
Nurse Practitioners of New York (NPNY)
North CarolinaNorth Carolina Nurse Practitioner Network (NCNPN)
North DakotaNorth Dakota Nurse Practitioner Association (NDNPA)
OhioOhio Association of Advanced Practice Nurses (OAAPN)
Northeast Ohio Nurse Practitioners (NEON)
OklahomaAssociation of Oklahoma Nurse Practitioners (AONP)
OregonNurse Practitioners of Oregon (NPO)
PennsylvaniaPennsylvania Coalition of Nurse Practitioners (PACNP)
Nurse Practitioners of Central Pennsylvania (NPCP)
Rhode IslandNurse Practitioner Alliance of Rhode Island (NPARI)
South CarolinaSouth Carolina Nurses Association (SCNA) – APRN Chapter
South DakotaNurse Practitioner Alliance of South Dakota (NPASD)
TennesseeTennessee Nurse Practitioner Association (TNNPA)
Northeast Tennessee Nurse Practitioner Association (NETNPA)
TexasTexas Nurse Practitioners (TNP)
Central Texas Nurse Practitioners (CTNP)
North Texas Nurse Practitioners (NTNP)
UtahUtah Nurse Practitioners (UNP)
VermontVermont Nurse Practitioners Association (VNPA)
VirginiaVirginia Council of Nurse Practitioners (VCNP)
Virginia Association of Doctors of Nursing Practice (VADNP)
WashingtonAdvanced Registered Nurse Practitioners United of Washington State (AUWS)
Puget Sound Nurse Practitioner Association (PSNPA)
Washington, DCNurse Practitioner Association of the District of Columbia (NPADC)
West VirginiaWest Virginia Nurses Association (WVNA)
WisconsinWisconsin Nurses Association (WNA) – Wisconsin APRN Coalition
Wisconsin Association of Nurse Practitioners (WANP)
WyomingWyoming Council for Advanced Practice Nursing (WCAPN)

International Associations

Finally, it’s an increasingly connected world, and the role of nurse practitioners is growing increasingly global. While education, credentialing, and scope of practice can vary dramatically from country to country, greater collaboration is taking place between the world’s nurse practitioners. International organizations support humanitarian efforts, provide outreach leadership, and explore other ways in which nurse practitioners take their expertise abroad.

Some international organizations for NPs include:

  • International Council of Nurse Practitioners (ICN NP/APN)
  • Nurse Practitioner Association of Canada (NPAC)
  • Nursing Beyond Borders (NBB)
Matt Zbrog

Matt Zbrog

Writer

Matt Zbrog is a writer and researcher from Southern California, and he believes a strong society demands a stronger healthcare system. Since early 2018, he’s written extensively about emerging topics in healthcare administration, healthcare research, and healthcare education. Drawing upon interviews with hospital CEOs, nurse practitioners, nursing professors, and advocacy groups, his writing and research are focused on learning from those who know the subject best.

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